January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

January 2014

Glaucoma and Dry Eye Disease

With January being Glaucoma Awareness Month, it is valuable to highlight that primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which is the most common cause of non-remediable blindness, is not well understood. However, a relationship has been identified between the incidence of POAG and reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in those patients. (1) One study published in the Journal, Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, investigates the evidence of decreased blood flow to the optic nerve which is directly influenced by fatty acids. The researchers further investigated if POAG patients have abnormal blood fatty acid composition compared to a healthy control. Indeed, the POAG patients studied had reduced EPA and DHA fatty acids and total Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.(2) These findings may be significant as EPA and DHA could modulate impaired systemic microcirculation, ocular blood flow, and positively impact optic neuropathy, which are the main physiological changes associated with glaucoma. Also noteworthy is the potential correlation that increased IOP may be affected with reduced levels of EPA as some of the anti-inflammatory metabolites of EPA are known to reduce IOP in Glaucoma patients.(3)

In addition to EPA and DHA being valuable clinical nutritional therapy systemically to address Glaucoma, it is also valuable concomitantly in normalizing the composition of the meibum, therefore helping to alleviate the discomfort of dry eye symptoms. Studies report that 40-50% of Glaucoma patients have Dry Eye Disease.(4) Not surprisingly, researchers found that severe dry eye symptoms were more common in patients using glaucoma drops than in those not using them (34% vs. 25%), and symptom severity increased with the number of glaucoma drop uses per day.(5)

Accordingly, a daily therapeutic dose (2-3grams) of triglyceride form EPA and DHA should have an additional clinical value for Glaucoma patients.

 

(1) Hongmei Ren, et al; Primary open-angle glaucoma patients have reduced levels of blood docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids 74 (2006) 157-163

(2) Hongmei Ren, et al; Primary open-angle glaucoma patients have reduced levels of blood docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids 74 (2006) 157-163

(3) Hongmei Ren, et al; Primary open-angle glaucoma patients have reduced levels of blood docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids 74 (2006) 157-163

(4) Williams, Ruth, Glaucoma Research Foundation, Dry Eye and Glaucoma: Double Trouble, April 2012

(5) American Glaucoma Society (AGS) 23rd annual meeting, abstract 100, Dry Eye Hinders Glaucoma Patients on drops, presented March 2, 2013

PRN’s Response to the Review of the SELECT Trial and Omega-3s

PRN’s Response to the Review of the SELECT Trial and Omega-3s

PRN is extremely proud of its history of product formulation and dosing based in sound evidence and peer-reviewed clinical nutritional science.  As a leader in clinical nutrition, we have been pleased to observe that research has recently been expanding to include studies that are nutritionally focused.  However, many of these studies are not always conducted using a prospective approach and measured against a control group.  These studies while scientifically flawed may be interpreted by the media to be “newsworthy” especially when the conclusions can be sensationalized.

The most recent example of this type of activity applies to the article “Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Risk in the SELECT Trial” published ahead of print in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.  This incredibly flawed study has created a firestorm in the media and has had quite an impact on the general public.  We have seen similar events in the past and it has always been the policy of the Medical Division at PRN to “let the dust settle a little” while we take a deeper dive into the data.  In the ensuing days and months we will be following that process and will be sharing a grounded and well-researched review of evidence in this regard from unbiased sources.  That said, PRN did want to share with you today the peer-reviewed commentary that was posted yesterday from the Global Organization of EPA and DHA (GOED) which commented on the aforementioned study’s experimental design, results, and takeaways on “what you should know.”

 

We have provided a link to this document below without further comment but would urge you to first read the study abstract on the left side and then carefully review the bullet points on the right side of the document.  PRN believes these highlights will speak for themselves.

 

http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=4ae075406cd789efec4e9ff09&id=6f3dc7a018&e=48d4e6582d

American Optometric Association

www.aao.org

The Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation

sjogrens.org

Eye Care America – Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

www.eyecareamerica.org

Bioavailablity of n-3 Fatty Acid Formulations

Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. jdcon@post4.tele.dk

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20638827

There’s nothing fishy about Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Dry Eye Syndrome

Medscape Ophthalmology

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/707984_2

Relation between dietary n–3 and n–6 fatty acids and clinically diagnosed dry eye syndrome in women

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

http://www.ajcn.org/content/82/4/887.abstract

Focus on Meibomianitis

To control or resolve blepharitis, the meibomian gland’s oil must be normalized. Antibiotics simply cause a temporary change.

aoc0311_Thera_Smith(6)

GOED – Global Organization for EPA and DHA

www.goedomega3.com